cookiecutter-flask-ask: a quick(er) start to Alexa skills!

If you develop for Amazon’s Alexa-powered devices, you must at some point have come across Flask-Ask, a project by John Wheeler that lets you quickly and easily build Python-based Skills for Alexa. It’s so easy, in fact, that John’s quickstart video, showing the creation of a Flask-Ask based Skill from zero to hero, takes less than five minutes! How awesome is that? Very awesome.

Bootstrapping a Flask-Ask project is not difficult – in fact, it’s pretty easy, but also pretty repetitive. And so, being the ingenious lazy developer I am, I’ve come up with a (somewhat opinionated) cookiecutter template for Flask-Ask.

Usage

Using the Flask-Ask cookiecutter should be trivial.  Make sure you have cookiecutter installed, either in a virtualenv that you have activated or your system installation of Python. Then, simply use  cookiecutter gh:chrisvoncsefalvay/cookiecutter-flask-ask to get started. Answer the friendly assistant’s questions, and voila! You have the basics of a Flask-Ask project all scaffolded.

Once you have scaffolded your project, you will have to create a virtualenv for your project and install dependencies by invoking pip install -r requirements.txt. You will also need ngrok to test your skill from your local device.

What’s in the box?

The cookiecutter has been configured with my Flask-Ask development preferences in mind, which in turn borrow heavily from John Wheeler‘s. The cookiecutter provides a scaffold of a Flask application, including not only session start handlers and an example intention but also a number of handlers for built-in Alexa intents, such as Yes, No and Help.

There is also a folder structure you might find useful, including an intent schema for some basic Amazon intents and a corresponding empty sample_utterances.txt file, as well as a gitkeep’d folder for custom slot types. Because I’m a huge fan of Sphinx documentation and strongly believe that voice apps need to be assiduously documented to live up to their potential, there is also a docs/ folder with a Makefile and an opinionated conf.py configuration file.

Is that all?!

Blissfully, yes, it is. Thanks to John’s extremely efficient and easy-to-use Flask-Ask project, you can discourse with your very own skill less than twenty minutes after starting the scaffolding!

You can find the cookiecutter-flask-ask project here. Issues, bugs and other woes are welcome, as are contributions (simply raise a pull request). For help and advice, you can find me on the Flask-Ask Gitter a lot during daytime CET.

cookiecutter-flask-ask is, of course, Swabware.

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